I have children, so I know that bumps, bruises, and accidents are part and parcel with childhood. In many cases, the bumps and bruises can be mended with a bandage and a kiss; what happens, though, when the bump results in a pediatric dental emergency? In this two-part series, I will review the basic procedures that will help you protect your child’s teeth in the event of a more significant childhood accident.

What To Do If a Baby Tooth is Knocked Out

  1. Contact my office as soon as possible. While baby teeth aren’t replanted as permanent teeth are, I can still help make your child more comfortable and prevent infection.
  2. Rinse your child’s mouth with cold water and apply a cold compress to help dull the pain and reduce inflammation.
  3. Spend your time comforting your child and let them know they will be okay.

What To Do If a Permanent Tooth is Knocked Out
Contact my office as soon as possible. Fast action can help save the tooth. If the tooth is knocked out after office hours, call the emergency number.

  1. Find the tooth and gently rinse it with cold water. Leave the deep cleaning and sterilization to me.
  2. If possible, place the tooth back in the socket and hold it in place with a washcloth.
  3. If you cannot access the socket, then place the tooth in a container of cold milk or your child’s saliva - NOT water.

With luck on our side, I won’t have to see your child for the pediatric emergencies above. If I do, however, you are armed with the knowledge to help your child maintain their healthy, natural teeth. If you know another parent who might benefit from this information, feel free to pass it along. Be sure to read next month’s email for part 2 of our pediatric dental emergency series.

Comments: